October 22, 2011

NYCC: Likes/Dislikes

One week ago I was in the masses at New York Comic Con. I didn't know much about the convention before I went and didn't even expect there to be masses. For some reason, I assumed it was a smaller convention. You'd think I'd learn to stop assuming (I predict saying that phrase about 5,000 more times in my life). Recent attendance reports put the number around 105,000. Not so cozy. NYCC was big, hairy, and crowded, but mostly good. And it was set in one of the most fabulous cities I've ever visited.


Overall, I had a fantastic time. I did the normal convention things: walking, interviewing, taking photos, hanging with friends, more walking. I left with stupidly heavy bags, a bruised shoulder from said bags, and fabulous memories with friends. Some good and bad points stick out though. Because I want to end with the positive, I'll start with the negative.

Dislikes

  • Narrow aisles - the tiny aisles made navigation difficult even at less crowded times. It was the first time I was ever physically shoved in a crowd.
  • Poor carpeting/rugs - Convention center carpeting is always ugly, but that's not what I'm talking about. Rugs weren't laid properly and the carpet was covered in piling. For a klutzy girl like me, it meant tripping. Repeatedly. I can't have been the only one.
  • Small panel rooms - Lines for panels closed early and if you got in, you might have been standing along the walls. I experienced it and heard it from several people. I'm not sure if this a new problem at NYCC, or if it's always been like this.
  • The smell - Parts of the exhibit hall smelled like a litter box.
  • Getting into the convention - I arrived to the convention Saturday morning around 11:30. It opened at 10. The line for ticket holders was still wrapped around the building.

Likes

  • Show staff - The show staff was nothing but helpful. They funneled people on the streets through the right doors and were happy to help with directions. They were also numerous and easy to spot.
  • Artist Alley - It was easy to ignore the exhibit hall because Artist Alley went on and on. I was seriously impressed by the number of awesome creators present at the show.
  • Lack of Hollywood - I have a great time at San Diego, but there are so many studios looming over the exhibit hall. They're fun, but it's not why I go to conventions.
  • Comics! - Related to the above, this convention actually felt like it was about comics. So many are just about sort of pop culture and entertainment in general, but this felt focused. The list of exhibitors and panel topics reflected this.
  • Panels - As per usual, I barely got to any panels. However. The list of panels I wanted to go to was longer than any list I've made for another convention. Topics covered creating graphic novels, Kickstarter programs, food and comics, superhero psychology, and so much more. Whoever is in charge of programming gets a big huzzah from me.
  • Location - I could leave the Javits Center, walk a few blocks, and be entirely free from the convention horde. Don't get me wrong, I love my fellow geeks, but it's nice to escape the sea of people wearing badges and carrying huge bags.

The end result? I'd definitely go back to NYCC. And not just because of the NY part.

crossposted at Geek Girls Network

2 comments:

  1. Glad to hear you had a good time overall! And that they actually had plentiful employees. When I went to Pasadena there was hardly anybody around!

    ReplyDelete
  2. I've experienced that at conventions, too. Or there are plenty of convention center employees but not anyone employed by the the convention holders. It can make all the difference.

    ReplyDelete

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